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Results tagged with Search options user 46

The question you're asking is designed to solicit opinions or best-practices on a particular topic, with the goal of reaching community consensus.

0
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No. The problem with having terms with site specific meanings is that we will turn it into a conversation between a bunch of insiders. That would discourage new members on the site. It gets too few p …
answered Apr 8 '16 by Tom Au
-3
votes
I don't like the word "studies." It is basically implied by the site, that we are "studying" languages. A better usage might be something like "field," or "discipline." That would imply some "subset" …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Tom Au
3
votes
A question is "on hold," rather than "closed" for five days. That was a change that SE used on its more established sites to give time for people to "rethink" a question that may not be the best. Som …
answered Apr 7 '16 by Tom Au
3
votes
0answers
I'm new to moderating and I closed this question as "general reference." This is a standard that is used on most other language sites; that if the answer to a question can be easily looked up on a sin …
asked Aug 18 '16 by Tom Au
1
vote
I refer you the to Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for languages. Its C2 level defines the highest non-native speaker. Someone better would be a native speaker. Anyone at or below the C2 …
answered Oct 27 '17 by Tom Au
12
votes
For every "learner," there is a teacher. "Teaching" is therefore an integral part of the language learning process. If you "teach," you're helping someone else learn. That's good enough for the site. …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Tom Au
2
votes
I have changed the wording of some questions from "How useful is X?" to: "What are the advantages (and disadvantages) of X? "Useful" is a vague, subjective word. Advantages and disadvantages are thi …
answered Apr 7 '16 by Tom Au
1
vote
I wouldn't be too happy with a question on this site that was "only" about the English language (my native language), because there are English Language and English Language Learners sites on Stack Ex …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Tom Au
0
votes
An alternative to "Language Learning" would be "Language Study." That would encompass both teaching and learning.
answered Apr 7 '16 by Tom Au
1
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There is a "Sandbox" on a handful of sites for highly technical issues. That is to allow newcomers to be coached on the intricacies of asking acceptable technical questions. For now, I don't see lang …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Tom Au
3
votes
IMHO, no. But we should set the bar higher. It's possible that there will be a brilliant, commonsense answer, without a reference. Those, we should keep. But an answer that ignores a specific reques …
answered Aug 14 '17 by Tom Au
-2
votes
Comments are temporary, answers are permanent. Basically, comments are "fixit" suggestions. But an answer is an actual response to the question. If your post "hints at" or "suggests" a response, it s …
answered Apr 7 '16 by Tom Au
3
votes
Sign language is a means of communicating, other than in standard English, and should therefore be on topic here.
answered Apr 5 '16 by Tom Au
0
votes
A "pros and cons" questions falls into a "comparison and contrast" mode. Even though there are two parts, they are basically one question.
answered Apr 7 '16 by Tom Au
0
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The thing to do is to ask questions in a way that draws a factual response. For instance, don't ask if X is better than Y (opinion). Instead, ask what are the advantages and disadvantages of X over Y …
answered Apr 8 '16 by Tom Au

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