-5

For example, see this question: Through which language can you learn the most other languages?

That question mentions about Tagalog, Arabic and Tamil language. Now I don't want to disrespect any language, but it is the fact that those languages are not very popular, and I have no idea about them. I think in some situations, more information about them is helpful for readers who are not familiar with. Two examples of the information that I think it will be helpful are location of the country/area where the language is mostly speak and its relation to one of a popular language.

To ask in another way, my native language is Vietnamese. When I mention about it, is it more helpful if I add that Vietnam is a country in South East Asia, and 70% of its vocabulary borrowed from ancient Chinese?

What do you think?

  • 1
    Such background information can be easily researched for anyone interested, so I would not add such details. Questions should focus on the specific details of what is being asked. – user3169 May 1 '16 at 17:47
6

Honestly, I don't think that's necessary. I think a quick Internet search about the language will give you everything you need to know.

Define popular. Do you mean most geographically dispersed? Most spoken? To prove my point, look at this. Tamil has 70 million native speakers while French has 73 million. Not a huge difference there, but you said in your post that you've never heard of Tamil. For that matter, have you heard of Javanese? It has 82 million native speakers, but I doubt you've ever heard of Javanese either, unless you're a native speaker or you know someone who speaks it. Just because you don't know a language exists doesn't mean it doesn't exist. You're most likely most familiar with Western languages, like Germanic or Romance languages, than you are the languages of the East.

I say we don't need to set a precedent that you should provide some background information about any language you refer to in your answer.

3

It depends

While I agree with fi12's answer, there's surely cases where someone wants information on learning dialects forgotten by the internet at large. While Wikipedia covers a lot of topics, there's probably an obscure edge case language out there that's not covered by Wikipedia + The rest of the web.

There's probably a case for people wanting to learn "fictional" languages that aren't covered by the internet at large.

For the most part, a quick internet does reveal the histories and semantics of the language but for those unavailable, defining/describing the semantic style of the language inside the question sounds right.

0

To ask in another way, my native language is Vietnamese. When I mention about it, is it more helpful if I add that Vietnam is a country in South East Asia, and 70% of its vocabulary borrowed from ancient Chinese?

No.

This doesn't add any clarity, or meaningful context to the question.

First, the language you speak or are learning is rarely of great importance on this site, which is about methods of learning, not about languages themselves.

Second, describing a language, where it's from, etc, is much better done by a link to Wikipedia, or some other source, than by doing it in your post.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .