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3 replaced http://spanish.stackexchange.com/ with https://spanish.stackexchange.com/
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1. What do you think the main job of moderator is?

Primarily, facilitating constructive community participation within the site. This can mean directing meta discussions, guiding question clarification, and promoting community initiatives.

A minor part of the job is also the daily minutiæ of responding to flags, deleting old comments, etc.

2. Do you have any previous experience as a moderator?

Yes. I have been a pro-tem moderator on Spanish.SESpanish.SE since 2011 when the site entered public beta.

3. Our site is a very new one. We can expect a lot of posts that are broad, but are about practical problems faced when learning a language. What is your opinions on such questions?

This question itself is too broad to really be answered. As with all SE sites, a question ought to be specific enough that there can be a reasonable expectation that it can be answered with a single, normal-length answer.

4. If you users fight over each other in comments, etc... how will you handle that situation?

SE has pretty good expectations and policies on how to respond to these situations, from contacting the offending users privately (via email or chat), up to temporary suspensions. These situations, fortunately, are very rare (in the last 5 years, I've only been involved in a single temporary suspension on Spanish.SE).

5. Some users who post great answers may not agree with the community. For example, they may want something to be included in our site which was previously agreed to be off-topic. How will you deal with such users? We surely don't want to loose their good answers.

I don't understand this question. Are you asking about questions or answers?

Questions which are off-topic are off-topic for a reason. At the risk of sounding curt, if a question is off-topic, it's because we don't want those answers.

If an answer is off-topic, but the question isn't, then it ought to be flagged as "Not an answer" and deleted.

6. You come across a question which you think should be closed. But major of the community people say the opposite. What will you do?

This is exceedingly rare, precisely because the community actually decides what is on-topic. If the majority of the community wants something to be on-topic, by definition, it is. :)

Far more often, a vocal minority of the community wants something to be on-topic. In these cases, the solution is to explain (on meta) the historical reasons that the question is off-topic. Occasionally, this leads to a re-evaluation, and the community as a whole can decide whether to change the criteria.

7. If a fellow moderator disagrees with you, how will you handle that situation?

Talk to them. We have mod-specific chat rooms for this sort of thing.

It's pretty rare that mods disagree on something especially important, though.

1. What do you think the main job of moderator is?

Primarily, facilitating constructive community participation within the site. This can mean directing meta discussions, guiding question clarification, and promoting community initiatives.

A minor part of the job is also the daily minutiæ of responding to flags, deleting old comments, etc.

2. Do you have any previous experience as a moderator?

Yes. I have been a pro-tem moderator on Spanish.SE since 2011 when the site entered public beta.

3. Our site is a very new one. We can expect a lot of posts that are broad, but are about practical problems faced when learning a language. What is your opinions on such questions?

This question itself is too broad to really be answered. As with all SE sites, a question ought to be specific enough that there can be a reasonable expectation that it can be answered with a single, normal-length answer.

4. If you users fight over each other in comments, etc... how will you handle that situation?

SE has pretty good expectations and policies on how to respond to these situations, from contacting the offending users privately (via email or chat), up to temporary suspensions. These situations, fortunately, are very rare (in the last 5 years, I've only been involved in a single temporary suspension on Spanish.SE).

5. Some users who post great answers may not agree with the community. For example, they may want something to be included in our site which was previously agreed to be off-topic. How will you deal with such users? We surely don't want to loose their good answers.

I don't understand this question. Are you asking about questions or answers?

Questions which are off-topic are off-topic for a reason. At the risk of sounding curt, if a question is off-topic, it's because we don't want those answers.

If an answer is off-topic, but the question isn't, then it ought to be flagged as "Not an answer" and deleted.

6. You come across a question which you think should be closed. But major of the community people say the opposite. What will you do?

This is exceedingly rare, precisely because the community actually decides what is on-topic. If the majority of the community wants something to be on-topic, by definition, it is. :)

Far more often, a vocal minority of the community wants something to be on-topic. In these cases, the solution is to explain (on meta) the historical reasons that the question is off-topic. Occasionally, this leads to a re-evaluation, and the community as a whole can decide whether to change the criteria.

7. If a fellow moderator disagrees with you, how will you handle that situation?

Talk to them. We have mod-specific chat rooms for this sort of thing.

It's pretty rare that mods disagree on something especially important, though.

1. What do you think the main job of moderator is?

Primarily, facilitating constructive community participation within the site. This can mean directing meta discussions, guiding question clarification, and promoting community initiatives.

A minor part of the job is also the daily minutiæ of responding to flags, deleting old comments, etc.

2. Do you have any previous experience as a moderator?

Yes. I have been a pro-tem moderator on Spanish.SE since 2011 when the site entered public beta.

3. Our site is a very new one. We can expect a lot of posts that are broad, but are about practical problems faced when learning a language. What is your opinions on such questions?

This question itself is too broad to really be answered. As with all SE sites, a question ought to be specific enough that there can be a reasonable expectation that it can be answered with a single, normal-length answer.

4. If you users fight over each other in comments, etc... how will you handle that situation?

SE has pretty good expectations and policies on how to respond to these situations, from contacting the offending users privately (via email or chat), up to temporary suspensions. These situations, fortunately, are very rare (in the last 5 years, I've only been involved in a single temporary suspension on Spanish.SE).

5. Some users who post great answers may not agree with the community. For example, they may want something to be included in our site which was previously agreed to be off-topic. How will you deal with such users? We surely don't want to loose their good answers.

I don't understand this question. Are you asking about questions or answers?

Questions which are off-topic are off-topic for a reason. At the risk of sounding curt, if a question is off-topic, it's because we don't want those answers.

If an answer is off-topic, but the question isn't, then it ought to be flagged as "Not an answer" and deleted.

6. You come across a question which you think should be closed. But major of the community people say the opposite. What will you do?

This is exceedingly rare, precisely because the community actually decides what is on-topic. If the majority of the community wants something to be on-topic, by definition, it is. :)

Far more often, a vocal minority of the community wants something to be on-topic. In these cases, the solution is to explain (on meta) the historical reasons that the question is off-topic. Occasionally, this leads to a re-evaluation, and the community as a whole can decide whether to change the criteria.

7. If a fellow moderator disagrees with you, how will you handle that situation?

Talk to them. We have mod-specific chat rooms for this sort of thing.

It's pretty rare that mods disagree on something especially important, though.

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source | link

1. What do you think the main job of moderator is?

Primarily, facilitating constructive community participation within the site. This can mean directing meta discussions, guiding question clarification, and promoting community initiatives.

A minor part of the job is also the daily minutiæ of responding to flags, deleting old comments, etc.

32. Do you have any previous experience as a moderator?

Yes. I have been a pro-tem moderator on Spanish.SE since 2011 when the site entered public beta.

3. Our site is a very new one. We can expect a lot of posts that are broad, but are about practical problems faced when learning a language. What is your opinions on such questions?

This question itself is too broad to really be answered. As with all SE sites, a question ought to be specific enough that there can be a reasonable expectation that it can be answered with a single, normal-length answer.

4. If you users fight over each other in comments, etc... how will you handle that situation?

SE has pretty good expectations and policies on how to respond to these situations, from contacting the offending users privately (via email or chat), up to temporary suspensions. These situations, fortunately, are very rare (in the last 5 years, I've only been involved in a single temporary suspension on Spanish.SE).

5. Some users who post great answers may not agree with the community. For example, they may want something to be included in our site which was previously agreed to be off-topic. How will you deal with such users? We surely don't want to loose their good answers.

I don't understand this question. Are you asking about questions or answers?

Questions which are off-topic are off-topic for a reason. At the risk of sounding curt, if a question is off-topic, it's because we don't want those answers.

If an answer is off-topic, but the question isn't, then it ought to be flagged as "Not an answer" and deleted.

6. You come across a question which you think should be closed. But major of the community people say the opposite. What will you do?

This is exceedingly rare, precisely because the community actually decides what is on-topic. If the majority of the community wants something to be on-topic, by definition, it is. :)

Far more often, a vocal minority of the community wants something to be on-topic. In these cases, the solution is to explain (on meta) the historical reasons that the question is off-topic. Occasionally, this leads to a re-evaluation, and the community as a whole can decide whether to change the criteria.

7. If a fellow moderator disagrees with you, how will you handle that situation?

Talk to them. We have mod-specific chat rooms for this sort of thing.

It's pretty rare that mods disagree on something especially important, though.

1. What do you think the main job of moderator is?

Primarily, facilitating constructive community participation within the site. This can mean directing meta discussions, guiding question clarification, and promoting community initiatives.

A minor part of the job is also the daily minutiæ of responding to flags, deleting old comments, etc.

3. Do you have any previous experience as a moderator?

Yes. I have been a pro-tem moderator on Spanish.SE since 2011 when the site entered public beta.

3. Our site is a very new one. We can expect a lot of posts that are broad, but are about practical problems faced when learning a language. What is your opinions on such questions?

This question itself is too broad to really be answered. As with all SE sites, a question ought to be specific enough that there can be a reasonable expectation that it can be answered with a single, normal-length answer.

4. If you users fight over each other in comments, etc... how will you handle that situation?

SE has pretty good expectations and policies on how to respond to these situations, from contacting the offending users privately (via email or chat), up to temporary suspensions. These situations, fortunately, are very rare (in the last 5 years, I've only been involved in a single temporary suspension on Spanish.SE).

5. Some users who post great answers may not agree with the community. For example, they may want something to be included in our site which was previously agreed to be off-topic. How will you deal with such users? We surely don't want to loose their good answers.

I don't understand this question. Are you asking about questions or answers?

Questions which are off-topic are off-topic for a reason. At the risk of sounding curt, if a question is off-topic, it's because we don't want those answers.

If an answer is off-topic, but the question isn't, then it ought to be flagged as "Not an answer" and deleted.

6. You come across a question which you think should be closed. But major of the community people say the opposite. What will you do?

This is exceedingly rare, precisely because the community actually decides what is on-topic. If the majority of the community wants something to be on-topic, by definition, it is. :)

Far more often, a vocal minority of the community wants something to be on-topic. In these cases, the solution is to explain (on meta) the historical reasons that the question is off-topic. Occasionally, this leads to a re-evaluation, and the community as a whole can decide whether to change the criteria.

7. If a fellow moderator disagrees with you, how will you handle that situation?

Talk to them. We have mod-specific chat rooms for this sort of thing.

It's pretty rare that mods disagree on something especially important, though.

1. What do you think the main job of moderator is?

Primarily, facilitating constructive community participation within the site. This can mean directing meta discussions, guiding question clarification, and promoting community initiatives.

A minor part of the job is also the daily minutiæ of responding to flags, deleting old comments, etc.

2. Do you have any previous experience as a moderator?

Yes. I have been a pro-tem moderator on Spanish.SE since 2011 when the site entered public beta.

3. Our site is a very new one. We can expect a lot of posts that are broad, but are about practical problems faced when learning a language. What is your opinions on such questions?

This question itself is too broad to really be answered. As with all SE sites, a question ought to be specific enough that there can be a reasonable expectation that it can be answered with a single, normal-length answer.

4. If you users fight over each other in comments, etc... how will you handle that situation?

SE has pretty good expectations and policies on how to respond to these situations, from contacting the offending users privately (via email or chat), up to temporary suspensions. These situations, fortunately, are very rare (in the last 5 years, I've only been involved in a single temporary suspension on Spanish.SE).

5. Some users who post great answers may not agree with the community. For example, they may want something to be included in our site which was previously agreed to be off-topic. How will you deal with such users? We surely don't want to loose their good answers.

I don't understand this question. Are you asking about questions or answers?

Questions which are off-topic are off-topic for a reason. At the risk of sounding curt, if a question is off-topic, it's because we don't want those answers.

If an answer is off-topic, but the question isn't, then it ought to be flagged as "Not an answer" and deleted.

6. You come across a question which you think should be closed. But major of the community people say the opposite. What will you do?

This is exceedingly rare, precisely because the community actually decides what is on-topic. If the majority of the community wants something to be on-topic, by definition, it is. :)

Far more often, a vocal minority of the community wants something to be on-topic. In these cases, the solution is to explain (on meta) the historical reasons that the question is off-topic. Occasionally, this leads to a re-evaluation, and the community as a whole can decide whether to change the criteria.

7. If a fellow moderator disagrees with you, how will you handle that situation?

Talk to them. We have mod-specific chat rooms for this sort of thing.

It's pretty rare that mods disagree on something especially important, though.

1
source | link

1. What do you think the main job of moderator is?

Primarily, facilitating constructive community participation within the site. This can mean directing meta discussions, guiding question clarification, and promoting community initiatives.

A minor part of the job is also the daily minutiæ of responding to flags, deleting old comments, etc.

3. Do you have any previous experience as a moderator?

Yes. I have been a pro-tem moderator on Spanish.SE since 2011 when the site entered public beta.

3. Our site is a very new one. We can expect a lot of posts that are broad, but are about practical problems faced when learning a language. What is your opinions on such questions?

This question itself is too broad to really be answered. As with all SE sites, a question ought to be specific enough that there can be a reasonable expectation that it can be answered with a single, normal-length answer.

4. If you users fight over each other in comments, etc... how will you handle that situation?

SE has pretty good expectations and policies on how to respond to these situations, from contacting the offending users privately (via email or chat), up to temporary suspensions. These situations, fortunately, are very rare (in the last 5 years, I've only been involved in a single temporary suspension on Spanish.SE).

5. Some users who post great answers may not agree with the community. For example, they may want something to be included in our site which was previously agreed to be off-topic. How will you deal with such users? We surely don't want to loose their good answers.

I don't understand this question. Are you asking about questions or answers?

Questions which are off-topic are off-topic for a reason. At the risk of sounding curt, if a question is off-topic, it's because we don't want those answers.

If an answer is off-topic, but the question isn't, then it ought to be flagged as "Not an answer" and deleted.

6. You come across a question which you think should be closed. But major of the community people say the opposite. What will you do?

This is exceedingly rare, precisely because the community actually decides what is on-topic. If the majority of the community wants something to be on-topic, by definition, it is. :)

Far more often, a vocal minority of the community wants something to be on-topic. In these cases, the solution is to explain (on meta) the historical reasons that the question is off-topic. Occasionally, this leads to a re-evaluation, and the community as a whole can decide whether to change the criteria.

7. If a fellow moderator disagrees with you, how will you handle that situation?

Talk to them. We have mod-specific chat rooms for this sort of thing.

It's pretty rare that mods disagree on something especially important, though.