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I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answeranswer to this questionthis question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does <insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idiom here>?
  • When do you pronounce <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does <insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idiom here>?
  • When do you pronounce <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does <insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idiom here>?
  • When do you pronounce <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

3 added 1 character in body
source | link

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does <insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idomidiom here>?
  • When do you pronounce <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does <insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idom here>?
  • When do you pronounce <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does <insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idiom here>?
  • When do you pronounce <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

2 added 25 characters in body
source | link

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does mean<insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idom here>?
  • When do you pronounce in <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does mean?
  • What is the origin of ?
  • When do you pronounce in
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

I believe the answer to this question is the same as the answer to this question:

Our site is "Language Learning", it's about the learning a language, so if language specific questions are about learning the language, it would be on-topic.

Questions shouldn't be about the language's spelling/syntax/semantics/etc., they should be about learning it.

Some examples of off-topic questions (feel free to edit more in):

  • What does <insert quote from a book> mean?
  • What is the origin of <insert idom here>?
  • When do you pronounce <insert letter here> in <insert language here>?
    That said, questions which apply to the process of learning a specific language, should somehow apply to a broader range of "similar" language. I'm not saying that all questions falling under this should be left open, if it has some other flaw such as being primarily-opinion based, it should be closed.

In other words, the on-topicness of the question is not based on the language, but on the question.

If the question is about learning, your target language can be Spanish, Esperanto, American Sign Language, or Klingon. It doesn't matter.

There will be very few (if any--I can't think of one now) questions that are unique to learning fictional/created languages. If such a question exists, though, it ought to be permitted, granted it is about learning.

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