4 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on Travel (e.g. uk, germany, france, china, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on Travel (e.g. uk, germany, france, china, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.
3 replaced http://travel.stackexchange.com/ with https://travel.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on TravelTravel (e.g. ukuk, germanygermany, francefrance, chinachina, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on Travel (e.g. uk, germany, france, china, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on Travel (e.g. uk, germany, france, china, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.
2 replaced http://meta.stackexchange.com/ with https://meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipediado not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on Travel (e.g. uk, germany, france, china, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on Travel (e.g. uk, germany, france, china, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.

Tag wiki excerpts

Most tag wiki excerpts for languages should probably have something generic like

For questions specific to learning or teaching the X language

Some tags may require more information, for example if the denomination of the language is not clear (e.g. with respect to which dialectal variants are included), or to indicate related tags. For example, we may have

For questions specific to learning or teaching Serbo-Croatian languages including Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and Montenegrin

(if we decide to have such a tag — this is just an example, not meant to be an argument in favor of this particular tag) or

This tag is for questions specific to learning or teaching the Mandarin Chinese. For questions about other Chinese variants, use other tags such as [cantonese]. For questions about learning Chinese characters, use [chinese-characters].

(once again, this is just an example, not meant to suggest we need this particular taxonomy). Note that in this example, I made the first part a complete sentence — there's an automated process that hides the beginning of the excerpt, to hide verbiage like “this tag is …” or “a <tag name> is …”, and it's sometimes overeager, so it's best to give it something recognizable to eat up.

Tag wiki bodies

In the tag wiki body, we should include information that is relevant to our community.

Please do not copy-paste from Wikipedia. Encyclopedic data is rarely needed: we don't care about the etymology of the name of the language, nor the summary of the language's history, nor a description of the language's history.

Here are some examples of things that are relevant here and should be included in tag wikis:

  1. Encyclopedic data that is directly relevant to learning or teaching the language
    • A brief summary of where the language is spoken (natively or as a trade language).
    • What script(s) the language is normally written in.
    • Important dialectal variants, and languages with mutual intercomprehension.
    • A general idea of what family the language belongs to.
    • If the language is extinct or nearly so, mention it.
  2. A curated list of external resources (reference material, learning tools, databases of material in the language, etc.).
  3. A curated list of questions with that tag, representing the most common issues.

Here are some good examples of tag wikis elsewhere on Stack Exchange:

  • Many of the high-traffic tags on Stack Overflow, for example php, c++, javascript, etc.
  • Country tags on Travel (e.g. uk, germany, france, china, etc.) follow a more or less consistent format. The first paragraph situates the country in the world and includes some essential information such as what language a traveler may be understood in and what the country's currency is. Other information in the tag wiki includes how to get a visa, main transport options, links to related tags (e.g. cities that have their own tag), etc.
1
source | link